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[_] Cabling the house

Stuart Henderson stu at spacehopper.org
Thu Apr 18 11:28:32 BST 2019

On 2019/04/18 07:44, Tom Spencer wrote:
> IMHO cat7 and cat6a are way overkill for a home installation. They were
> designed to support 10gig speeds at and beyond 100m cable lengths, are
> shielded so require very precise termination, and are very expensive
> compared to cat6. If cat6 cable is laid and terminated well then you’ll be
> able to achieve 10gig or approaching 10gig speeds in a home environment
> (provided each cable is <50m long, which it will be unless you live in
> Ashton Court).

Absolutely. I'd even consider whether cat6 is worth it over cat5e (for
hassle rather than cost reasons; thicker cable, and slightly harder to
terminate as you have to maintain the twist right up to the termination
point in order to keep it in spec; though if you're paying a proper
network installer to do it anyway that's less of a concern)).

2.5Gb over copper is spec'd to run on cat5e out to 100m, and in all
likelihood 5Gbps will work over usual domestic distances. (And unlike
10Gb over copper it also supports PoE, which is handy as one of the
main uses is for fast wifi APs).
https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/2.5GBASE-T_and_5GBASE-T

> On Wed, 17 Apr 2019 at 22:30, Steve Roome <me at stephenroome.com> wrote:
> 
> > I thought I'd check out cat7 options and I think given the time and effort
> > to rewire a house I'd certainly go all out with cat7 instead.
> >
> > Until this morning I'd have gone 6e as well but a few extra quid it doesn't
> > seem worth maybe needing to redo it in five years when 10gig is more
> > normal.

You might have to redo it anyway if a rodent gets a taste for cable ;)
Try to allow for some options to help rewiring if needed, at least an easy
route (maybe conduit) between floors.

(Also: if you want any fibre in the cabling mix, use single mode unless
there's a very good reason not to!)